Social and Sexual Etiquette

By
Jeremy Selman-Troytt



Social & Sexual Etiquette


O'Rourke & LeFevre

London
MCMXVI







Contents

Part One .................................................. Preparations for Romantic Introduction

Part Two .................................................................. The Romantic Introduction

Part Three ......................................................................... Subsequent Meetings

Part Four ............................................................................ Becoming Engaged

Part Five ........................................................................... The Wedding Night

Part Six ....................................................... Subsequent Procreational Encounters

Part Seven .................................................... Procreation and Religion - The Facts

Part Eight ................................................... Procreation and the Effect of Weight

Part Nine ............................................................. Miscellaneous Considerations








Preface

Science, morality and education are the forces that drive all my work. However, these are joined by a further force in the production of this volume: a desire to propel adults into a more 'modern' mode of behaviour in keeping with the technological advances of our age. In a world of aeroplanes and wireless telegraphy, many of the traditional ways we regard and refer to our bodies and their organs have simply become obsolete.

My consultancy work brings me into daily contact with people who are confused or frightened. Frequently they are both. Often their fear relates to social and physical encounters with the opposite gender, whilst their confusion is seldom unconnected with the function and value of their physical parts. It is in order to seek a professional opinion as to the suitability of these parts that many come to me.

I should like to emphasise that feelings of embarrassment during this latter procedure are now wholly out of place. It should not be considered immoral or suspicious to request an opinion on the acceptability of one's prepuce (provided that one is a man). Any modern man worthy of the appellation should champion his right to seek such an opinion without worrying that this course of action will cause him to be shunned by his neighbours or his church. Similarly, a 'modern' woman should now have the confidence to submit her pudenda to rigorous examination. Both exercises should be regarded as natural, and no different to buying a hat.

For too long we have allowed an outmoded sense of false modesty to restrain us from seeking the information we need about our parts. This want of education means that many feel under-prepared and under-confident when embarking upon the romantic courtship that is the first step on the road to procreation. Later in the process, we may be confused by fundamental courtship events, such as identifying an ejaculation, and become worried about whether it has happened at the appropriate time, in the appropriate place, with the appropriate person. At each stage of the procreational process, therefore, we may find ourselves stumbling uncertainly, fearful that we may commit a faux pas that will cause our partners to shrink back in horror or repugnance.

Moreover, there is a very great danger inherent in any situation where myths rush in to fill the vacuum created by ignorance. Solid scientific facts are required to avert this danger.

Accordingly I have set down a series of guidelines designed to pilot the reader through every procreational step in human relationships, from pre-introduction preparations to physical union within the marital state. If adhered to completely, these guidelines will lead to an act of congress and the guaranteed production of a child, with the minimum of fear and repugnance, under any conceivable circumstances.







Introduction

The first meeting with a prospective marital partner can be a frightening experience. The man may not know what to say, or what parts may be touched, and at what stage. The woman, too, may stand mute, ignorant as to what type of contact may be appropriate or whether the man's features are correct. The result, in both parties, is fear.

The simple rules that follow lay down established protocols that will lessen the chance of errors, increase confidence and minimise the possibility of ridicule, shame and humiliation ...


The remainder of this work can be found in The Selman-Troytt Papers


























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